A Terrible Country

A Terrible Country

A literary triumph about Russia, family, love, and loyalty--the first novel in ten years from a founding editor of n+1 and author of All the Sad Young Literary Men When Andrei Kaplan's older brother Dima insists that Andrei return to Moscow to care for their ailing grandmother, Andrei must take stock of his life in New York. His girlfriend has stopped returning his text mes A literary triumph about Russia, family, love, and loyalty--the first novel in ten years from a founding editor of n+...

DownloadRead Online
Title:A Terrible Country
Author:Keith Gessen
Rating:
Genres:Fiction
ISBN:A Terrible Country
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:338 pages pages

A Terrible Country Reviews

  • Greg Zimmerman
    Aug 02, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    The horrid book cover is useless, extraneous, exploding into a papery cloud, covering everything in a glossy confetti and there is much joy in the sight and feel of it. Readers display time and space disaffect, it's all done with mirrors, yes, smoky mirrors, the storyline ...

    fantastic, moving, I read it in a day basically ...

    Excellent and authentic - a moving story, told with humor and empathy. ...

    If the notes from the editor weren't included in the ARC, the book may have been a bit more pleasant to read. The notes were distracting because I'd find myself questioning the responses, wondering about the page numbers, the accuracy of the wording. To some degree, the book felt ...

    First appeared at https://www.thenewdorkreviewofbooks.c... Putin's Russia may be a terrible country, but this is a terrific novel! It's 2008 (so well before any of the current Russian meddling conversation) and a mid-30s, failing academic named Andrei travels to Moscow to take care ...

  • James
    Aug 07, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

  • Zach
    Jul 24, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

  • Sean Carman
    Mar 31, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    The horrid book cover is useless, extraneous, exploding into a papery cloud, covering everything in a glossy confetti and there is much joy in the sight and feel of it. Readers display time and space disaffect, it's all done with mirrors, yes, smoky mirrors, the storyline ...

    fantastic, moving, I read it in a day basically ...

    Excellent and authentic - a moving story, told with humor and empathy. ...

    If the notes from the editor weren't included in the ARC, the book may have been a bit more pleasant to read. The notes were distracting because I'd find myself questioning the responses, wondering about the page numbers, the accuracy of the wording. To some degree, the book felt ...

    First appeared at https://www.thenewdorkreviewofbooks.c... Putin's Russia may be a terrible country, but this is a terrific novel! It's 2008 (so well before any of the current Russian meddling conversation) and a mid-30s, failing academic named Andrei travels to Moscow to take care ...

    So many layers to this book..I didn't realized it was breaking my heart until I got the last few pages and couldn't stop crying. This is an easy read that you really don't wanna put down and captures the confusion of growing up and understanding your family. I thought it was completely...

    Visit my blog at https://cavebookreviews.blogspot.com/ Andrei Kaplan, a perpetual student of Russian literature, succumbs to his brother pleas to return to Moscow for a short time to take care of their grandmother and help him settle some real estate issues. Andrei, becomes Andryush...

    This simply and beautifully written novel about a drifting Russian studies expert who can't find his academic footing ("As for me, I wasn't really an idiot," he explains), and who returns to Russia in search of something he can't quite name, is so many wonderful things in one. It i...

  • Tonstant Weader
    Jul 07, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

  • Jennifer
    Jul 17, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

  • Emma
    Aug 31, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    The horrid book cover is useless, extraneous, exploding into a papery cloud, covering everything in a glossy confetti and there is much joy in the sight and feel of it. Readers display time and space disaffect, it's all done with mirrors, yes, smoky mirrors, the storyline ...

    fantastic, moving, I read it in a day basically ...

  • Tommi
    Sep 04, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

  • Paul Fulcher
    Jul 03, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

  • Liz
    Jun 12, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

  • Diane S ☔
    Jul 28, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

  • Holly
    Sep 05, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

  • RoseMary Achey
    Aug 23, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

  • Diane Payne
    May 31, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    The horrid book cover is useless, extraneous, exploding into a papery cloud, covering everything in a glossy confetti and there is much joy in the sight and feel of it. Readers display time and space disaffect, it's all done with mirrors, yes, smoky mirrors, the storyline ...

    fantastic, moving, I read it in a day basically ...

    Excellent and authentic - a moving story, told with humor and empathy. ...

    If the notes from the editor weren't included in the ARC, the book may have been a bit more pleasant to read. The notes were distracting because I'd find myself questioning the responses, wondering about the page numbers, the accuracy of the wording. To some degree, the book felt ...

  • Kimberley
    Jul 06, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    The horrid book cover is useless, extraneous, exploding into a papery cloud, covering everything in a glossy confetti and there is much joy in the sight and feel of it. Readers display time and space disaffect, it's all done with mirrors, yes, smoky mirrors, the storyline ...

    fantastic, moving, I read it in a day basically ...

    Excellent and authentic - a moving story, told with humor and empathy. ...

    If the notes from the editor weren't included in the ARC, the book may have been a bit more pleasant to read. The notes were distracting because I'd find myself questioning the responses, wondering about the page numbers, the accuracy of the wording. To some degree, the book felt ...

    First appeared at https://www.thenewdorkreviewofbooks.c... Putin's Russia may be a terrible country, but this is a terrific novel! It's 2008 (so well before any of the current Russian meddling conversation) and a mid-30s, failing academic named Andrei travels to Moscow to take care ...

    So many layers to this book..I didn't realized it was breaking my heart until I got the last few pages and couldn't stop crying. This is an easy read that you really don't wanna put down and captures the confusion of growing up and understanding your family. I thought it was completely...

    Visit my blog at https://cavebookreviews.blogspot.com/ Andrei Kaplan, a perpetual student of Russian literature, succumbs to his brother pleas to return to Moscow for a short time to take care of their grandmother and help him settle some real estate issues. Andrei, becomes Andryush...

    This simply and beautifully written novel about a drifting Russian studies expert who can't find his academic footing ("As for me, I wasn't really an idiot," he explains), and who returns to Russia in search of something he can't quite name, is so many wonderful things in one. It i...

    I received an advanced eGalley of "A Terrible Country", by Keith Gessen, via NetGalley. Thank you to both. Andrei is in a rut. His degree in Russian Literature hasn't netted him the academic career he wants, his girlfriend recently broke up with him, and he's sulking the days away ...

  • ❤Marie Gentilcore
    Jul 18, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

  • Jill Dobbe
    May 04, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

  • Danielle Tremblay
    Jun 06, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

  • Chris Roberts
    Jul 10, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    The horrid book cover is useless, extraneous, exploding into a papery cloud, covering everything in a glossy confetti and there is much joy in the sight and feel of it. Readers display time and space disaffect, it's all done with mirrors, yes, smoky mirrors, the storyline ...

  • Anatoly Molotkov
    Aug 06, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    The horrid book cover is useless, extraneous, exploding into a papery cloud, covering everything in a glossy confetti and there is much joy in the sight and feel of it. Readers display time and space disaffect, it's all done with mirrors, yes, smoky mirrors, the storyline ...

    fantastic, moving, I read it in a day basically ...

    Excellent and authentic - a moving story, told with humor and empathy. ...

  • Steven Z.
    Aug 06, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

  • Neil
    Aug 27, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

  • Gumble's Yard
    Jun 17, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

  • Liz
    Jun 12, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    The horrid book cover is useless, extraneous, exploding into a papery cloud, covering everything in a glossy confetti and there is much joy in the sight and feel of it. Readers display time and space disaffect, it's all done with mirrors, yes, smoky mirrors, the storyline ...

    fantastic, moving, I read it in a day basically ...

    Excellent and authentic - a moving story, told with humor and empathy. ...

    If the notes from the editor weren't included in the ARC, the book may have been a bit more pleasant to read. The notes were distracting because I'd find myself questioning the responses, wondering about the page numbers, the accuracy of the wording. To some degree, the book felt ...

    First appeared at https://www.thenewdorkreviewofbooks.c... Putin's Russia may be a terrible country, but this is a terrific novel! It's 2008 (so well before any of the current Russian meddling conversation) and a mid-30s, failing academic named Andrei travels to Moscow to take care ...

    So many layers to this book..I didn't realized it was breaking my heart until I got the last few pages and couldn't stop crying. This is an easy read that you really don't wanna put down and captures the confusion of growing up and understanding your family. I thought it was completely...

    Visit my blog at https://cavebookreviews.blogspot.com/ Andrei Kaplan, a perpetual student of Russian literature, succumbs to his brother pleas to return to Moscow for a short time to take care of their grandmother and help him settle some real estate issues. Andrei, becomes Andryush...

  • Barry Smirnoff
    Jul 16, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

  • Sonya
    Mar 31, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

  • Patricia Doyle
    May 27, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

  • Matilda
    Aug 03, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

    Magnificent. A truly moving and funny and beautiful novel about that time in America where it was possible to connect to Wi-fi but also possible to not have a cell phone. Except this book is about an American living in Putin's Russia just as the American economy explodes in 2008. I fin...

    The horrid book cover is useless, extraneous, exploding into a papery cloud, covering everything in a glossy confetti and there is much joy in the sight and feel of it. Readers display time and space disaffect, it's all done with mirrors, yes, smoky mirrors, the storyline ...

    fantastic, moving, I read it in a day basically ...

    Excellent and authentic - a moving story, told with humor and empathy. ...

    If the notes from the editor weren't included in the ARC, the book may have been a bit more pleasant to read. The notes were distracting because I'd find myself questioning the responses, wondering about the page numbers, the accuracy of the wording. To some degree, the book felt ...

    First appeared at https://www.thenewdorkreviewofbooks.c... Putin's Russia may be a terrible country, but this is a terrific novel! It's 2008 (so well before any of the current Russian meddling conversation) and a mid-30s, failing academic named Andrei travels to Moscow to take care ...

    So many layers to this book..I didn't realized it was breaking my heart until I got the last few pages and couldn't stop crying. This is an easy read that you really don't wanna put down and captures the confusion of growing up and understanding your family. I thought it was completely...

  • Roxanne
    Aug 15, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...

    3.5 stars. In A Terrible Country, the main character, Andrei Kaplan, like the author is Russian born and from a young age was raised in America. The year is 2008 and 33 year old Andrei is called back to Russia by his older brother, Dima, to look after their 88 year old grandmother who ...

    A Terrible Country is the story of Andrew/Andrei, who was born in Moscow and immigrated to the United States as a child. Now an adult , he leaves New York to return to Russia to care for his 80-something-year-old grandmother. The book follows Andrei and his struggles to acclimate, but,...

    I'm happy that Keith Gessen has finally written his Russia novel. I enjoyed this immensely. ...

    This was an amiable page-turner for most of the book, but it felt more like a long New Yorker article than a novel, if you see what I mean. I like that the author attempts to inject political urgency and ideas into the novel form, which seems to me like an important thing to do just no...

    When a young American man returns to Russia to care for his elderly grandmother you can only imagine what he encounters. Keith Gessen is a talented writer who knows how to engage and keep the reader moving through the story. There are some terrific lines in this novel. ...

    Andrei is treading water in his career, moderating online forums for university classes in Russian literature while never landing his own teaching job. So, when his brother Dima called to ask Andrei to fly to Moscow and stay with their grandmother while he took care of business concern...

    A very entertaining novel about a 33 year old American, Andrew Kaplan, whose family left Russia in 1981. In 2008, Andrew, the youngest child, returns to Moscow. His 89 year old Grandmother still lives in an apartment that Stalin gave her because of her work on a Soviet film. His brothe...

    Hmmm...truth be told I picked this book up after seeing George Saunders and Nell Zink's cover praise. While the book was worth reading, Gessen makes you care about his main character's sweet loyalty to his dementia addled Grandma and the knowledge I gleaned about modern day Moscow, the...

  • Fikayo Adebolajo
    Aug 21, 2018

    Andrei emigrated with his parents from Russia at the age of six. Now, he's 33 and returning to Moscow to take care of his 89 year old grandmother, who?s suffering from some dementia. And who?s lonely because all her friends are dead. The book takes you to 2008 Moscow. You feel li...

    This is a terrible country. My Yolka took to America. Why did you come back?? She seemed angry. A Terrible Country by Keith Gessen is published in the UK by perhaps my favourite of all publishers, Fitzcarraldo Editions, but is an odd fit for the "ambitious, imaginative and innova...

    Keith Gessen was born in Russia of Jewish parents, who emigrated to the US when he was still a child ? and is now an author, journalist (specialising in Russia), book-critic, translator and journal editor. This is his second novel ? and comes with by George Saunders and Elif Ba...

    At a time when Russia, Putin, conspiracy, and collusion dominate the news cycle it is wonderful to escape into a work of fiction that is absorbing, appealing to human emotion on many levels, and sadly, a comment on the reality of Russia today. As useful and engrossing as Keith Gessen?...

    As a young immigrant from the Soviet Union, i related to the book a lot. Russia may have capitalism but it doesnt mean the corruption went away. Only the people who have connections and money survive Russia. Anyone interested in how Russia continues to operate should read this book. I ...

    Review soon. ...

    This is a book about what it means to return to a place that is no longer home. Reading it brought back memories of Tommy Orange?s ?There there?, or, more specifically, of Gertrude Stein?s quote about Oakland, ?there is no there there? from which Orange?s book drew its ti...

    A man returns to Moscow to take care of his grandmother and discovers Putin's Russia, its new prosperity and its old problems. I have not read Gessen's previous novel, but it seems that the author began this one where he finished the previous one, in 2008, and that the main characte...

    I loved this book! It?s been nearly a week since I finished and I miss it still and wish there was more. It is a novel but it reads like a memoir. It starts off with Andrei coming back to Moscow to take care of his grandmother while his older brother is out of the country. Andrei was...

    To justify another 5-star rating for my beloved blue publisher, especially because this title seems to receive more criticism than some others (and I can see where it?s coming from), here are some of my subjective reasons for the grade: - It?s written in refreshingly short, easy...

    I enjoyed this book about Russia from someone who was born there, lived there for a time, and speaks the language. Reading about the author's Russian grandmother, and his relationship with her, was the highlight of the book for me. His writing was honest, true-to-life, and at times, ve...

    When I stumbled on this book, reading the description and summary, I made the purchase with trepidation, (it just seemed to much of a high praise for a name I?ve never even heard). Now that I?ve completed it I just might have found myself a new favorite author in Keith Gessen. ...